REMEMBER ADVERTISING?

 

Ed McCabe wrote ads, he sold things.

In the days before planners, when creatives could think.

He worked out what the product was, what the market was, what the problem was, and he solved it.

Read more on REMEMBER ADVERTISING?…

THE REAL, REAL MEDIA

In 2001 the twin towers collapsed.

What was the effect on the average person?

Not the publicised shock, anger, and grief that the entire nation felt.

How did it affect the behaviour of the individual?

Read more on THE REAL, REAL MEDIA…

ADVERTISING DOESN’T WORK LIKE WE THINK IT WORKS

 

Recently I spent an afternoon with one of my heroes, Ed McCabe.

Ed was, after Bill Bernbach, one of the most influential advertising people in New York.

Bill Bernbach introduced charming, intelligent advertising.

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DON’T GO WITH THE FLOW

 

It doesn’t happen every time we’re stopped at the traffic lights.

But it happens often enough.

My wife is driving, so she has her foot on the brake.

We’re talking, but I’m watching the traffic lights.

Read more on DON’T GO WITH THE FLOW…

NOT JUST ANOTHER BEAN-COUNTER

Barry Hearn was one of the youngest people ever to become a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants.

But Barry Hearn was from east London.

So that added something else to his ability with numbers.

Read more on NOT JUST ANOTHER BEAN-COUNTER…

THE LADY WITH THE CHART

 

Florence Nightingale was born in 1820.

At that time women weren’t allowed to go to university.

It would be a waste, their job was to marry and look after their husband and children.

Read more on THE LADY WITH THE CHART…

I WISH

One day at GGT I opened a letter.

It was on very stylish notepaper and it was from David Abbott.

David said he was running a spread in Campaign that week featuring my name in the headline, and he hoped I didn’t mind.

Read more on I WISH…

WRITER WITH A CAP W

My favourite David Abbott story is about the Economist campaign.

Actually, the Economist campaign we all remember was the third one Abbott Mead Vickers did.

The first was a TV ad featuring an animated head that opened up and things went into it.

Read more on WRITER WITH A CAP W…

CHUTZPAH

Chutzpah is a Jewish word meaning audacity.
In 1980, Eli Beer was a seventeen-year-old boy living in Jerusalem.
He wanted to do something worthwhile, so he volunteered to be an Emergency Medical Technician working on ambulances.
But the traffic in Jerusalem is terrible, the ambulance always took a minimum of twenty minutes to get to an emergency.
Once, his ambulance was called to a little girl choking, by the time they got there she was dead.
A doctor said “I was a block away, I could have saved her”.
Eli Beer went to see his boss.
He said he and a dozen colleagues all lived in the same area.
If the dispatcher would let them know when there was an emergency in their area they could run there fast, and keep the patient alive until the ambulance arrived.
His boss said “Kid, go back to school or go open a falafel stand. We don’t need your wild ideas”.
What Eli Beer did next was an example of chutzpah.
He thought “The hell with you. If you won’t give me the addresses I’ll get them myself”.
And he bought two police-band radios.
Almost immediately he heard about a nearby car crash.
He ran to the scene and found an old man bleeding to death.
He stopped the bleeding and kept the man alive until the ambulance arrived, twenty minutes later.
And he thought, in two years that’s the first life I’ve saved.
At that point he quit ambulances and started Hatzalah United.
He would listen for emergencies and broadcast the details to whichever of his volunteers was nearest.
And they kept patients alive until the ambulances arrived.
Then Eli Beer decided they could save even more lives with a little bit more chutzpah.
All the ambulances were getting stuck in traffic.
But what if the ambulances could travel through the traffic, even on the pavement?
They needed motorbikes that were equipped like ambulances, with blood plasma and defibrillators.
With more chutzpah, Eli Beer began raising money to buy them.
Now they could get to any emergency inside three minutes.
They could keep people alive until the ambulance got there.
And they began saving more lives, and more lives.
And Eli Beer raised more money to buy more motorbikes.
Currently they have two hundred medically equipped motorbikes across Israel.
Every motorbike will save, on average, 120 lives a year.
Hatzalah United saves lives regardless of race, religion, or nationality.
In fact, when Eli Beer’s own father had a heart attack, his life was saved by one of Hatzalah United’s Moslem volunteers.
So successful is Hatzalah United, it’s being copied in Brazil, India, Mexico, even Australia.
And it’s saving lives in all those places.
None of which would have happened without a seventeen-year-old boy’s chutzpah.
The dictionary defines chutzpah as:
“The personal confidence that allows one to do things that may seem shocking to others.
Gall, brazen nerve, effrontery, insolence, audacity, temerity, presumption plus arrogance”.

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VEHICLE FOR GROWTH

When Henry Ford started making cars, few people had them.
Ford knew that cars were only bought by the rich.
So obviously his strategy would be market growth, not market share.
In 1908, the average car cost over $2,000.
So he launched the Model T costing just $800.
People who’d never even considered owning a car could now afford one.

Read more on VEHICLE FOR GROWTH…

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